Diets

Healthy diet Teaching 2405

SN instructed patient/cg regarding diet modification promoting wound healing: increase protein in your diet. Food reach in protein: eggs, meat, cheese, milk, fish, peanut butter, legumes. Drink at least 8 glasses of water every day. Eat food reach in vitamin C ( citrus fruits and juices, strawberries, tomatoes, broccoli, potatoes) and zinc such as fortified cereals, red meat, and seafood. Patient Verbalize 80% understanding: Requires more instructions.

Healthy diet Teaching 2402

SN instructed patient on heart healthy diet: reduce na intake by choosing fresh vegetables instead of canned, choose healthy fats which includes olive and canola oil, walnuts and flax seeds, avoid foods that include margarine, avoid fried foods, and eat more soluble fiber foods such as apples, broccoli, carrots and avoid fatty meats such as hotdogs, sausage and bacon.

Cardiac Teaching 2379

Instructed patient that certain medications you might be taking, including Coumadin (Warfarin Sodium Tablets), also require special nutritional precautions. Your doctor or LVAD coordinator can provide you with detailed nutritional guidelines for your particular situation. Understanding was verbalized.

Healthy diet Teaching 2345

SN instructed patient and caregiver about Jevity, an enteral nutrition formulas are used as nutritional replacements for patients who are unable to get enough nutrients in their diet. These formulas are taken by mouth and are used by the body for energy and to form substances needed for normal body functions. Use the amount recommended by your doctor. This preparation is in ready-to-use form. No dilution is needed unless directed by your physician. Shake the preparation well before opening. Refrigerate after opening, out of the reach of children. Most formulas can be kept in the refrigerator for 1 to 2 days. Check the label of your product.

Potassium Teaching 2344

SN instructed patient and caregiver that potassium is available in foods such as asparagus, tomatoes and green leafy vegetables such as spinach. Some salt substitutes contain potassium. Avoid fruits like bananas and oranges if you are on a diabetic diet. If levels drop too low or spike too high, your heart function suffers, becoming slow or erratic, a condition known as arrhythmias. Because abnormal potassium levels greatly impact your heart function and can ultimately lead to a heart attack, it’s essential to follow your doctor’s advice carefully. Most common reasons for potassium loss is from vomiting, diarrhea, laxative use and diuretic use.

Foods Teaching 2339

SN instructed about avoid convenience foods such as canned soups, entrees, vegetables, pasta and rice mixes, frozen dinners, instant cereal and puddings, and gravy sauce mixes. Select frozen meals that contain around 600 mg sodium or less. Use fresh, frozen, no-added-salt canned vegetables, low-sodium soups, and low-sodium lunch-meats.

Low fat diet Teaching 2323

Avoid convenience foods such as canned soups, entrees, vegetables, pasta and rice mixes, frozen dinners, instant cereal and puddings, and gravy sauce mixes. Select frozen meals that contain around 600 mg sodium or less. Use fresh, frozen, no-added-salt canned vegetables, low-sodium soups, and low-sodium lunch meats.

Fats Teaching 2153

SN Instructed patient and caregiver on good fats vs bad fats basically. There are two groups of fats: saturated and unsaturated. Within each group are several more types of fats. The unsaturated fats. Unsaturated fats include polyunsaturated fatty acids and monounsaturated fats. Both mono and polyunsaturated fats, when eaten in moderation and used to replace saturated or trans fats, can help lower cholesterol levels and reduce your risk of heart disease, Polyunsaturated fats, found mostly in vegetable oils, help lower both blood cholesterol levels and triglyceride levels, especially when you substitute them for saturated fats. One type of polyunsaturated fat is omega - 3 fatty acids.

Bad fats diet Teaching 2152

SN instructed patient on the 'Bad' fats in your diet. There are two types of fat that should be eaten sparingly: saturated and trans fatty acids. Both can raise cholesterol levels, clog arteries, and increase the risk for heart disease. Saturated fats are found in animal products ( meat, poultry skin, high - fat dairy and eggs ) and in vegetable fats that are liquid at room temperature, such as coconut and palm oils. There is evidence that saturated fats have an effect on increasing colon and prostate cancer risk, so we recommend whenever possible to choose healthy unsaturated fats and always strive to be at a healthy weight. Patient / caregiver verbalized understanding of teaching.

Meal schedule Teaching 2132

Patient was instructed to create a meal schedule that she can follow, because she may just be forgetting to eat. The physiological drive to eat decreases with age, so she may not experience the same physical signals of hunger as she did at a younger age. Set and stick to specific meal times to help improve her eating habits. Encourage her to eat at the same times each day to create regularity.