Diets

Nursing Continuing Education

Diabetic diet Teaching 2121

SN instructed on a importance of a healthy diabetic diet high in fiber, but low in fat, and eating at a regular time throughout the day. A bowl of oatmeal a day can really bring down cholesterol. Follow a diet rich in healthy fats like vegetable oils and fish. And avoid foods high in saturated fats and trans fats.

Meal schedule Teaching 2132

Patient was instructed to create a meal schedule that she can follow, because she may just be forgetting to eat. The physiological drive to eat decreases with age, so she may not experience the same physical signals of hunger as she did at a younger age. Set and stick to specific meal times to help improve her eating habits. Encourage her to eat at the same times each day to create regularity.

Bad fats diet Teaching 2152

SN instructed patient on the 'Bad' fats in your diet. There are two types of fat that should be eaten sparingly: saturated and trans fatty acids. Both can raise cholesterol levels, clog arteries, and increase the risk for heart disease. Saturated fats are found in animal products ( meat, poultry skin, high - fat dairy and eggs ) and in vegetable fats that are liquid at room temperature, such as coconut and palm oils. There is evidence that saturated fats have an effect on increasing colon and prostate cancer risk, so we recommend whenever possible to choose healthy unsaturated fats and always strive to be at a healthy weight. Patient / caregiver verbalized understanding of teaching.

Fats Teaching 2153

SN Instructed patient and caregiver on good fats vs bad fats basically. There are two groups of fats: saturated and unsaturated. Within each group are several more types of fats. The unsaturated fats. Unsaturated fats include polyunsaturated fatty acids and monounsaturated fats. Both mono and polyunsaturated fats, when eaten in moderation and used to replace saturated or trans fats, can help lower cholesterol levels and reduce your risk of heart disease, Polyunsaturated fats, found mostly in vegetable oils, help lower both blood cholesterol levels and triglyceride levels, especially when you substitute them for saturated fats. One type of polyunsaturated fat is omega - 3 fatty acids.

Healthy diet Teaching 1938

SN instructed that a healthy diet is a major factor in reducing your risk of heart disease. A healthy diet and lifestyle can reduce your risk of heart disease, heart attacks, and stroke. Most fruits and vegetables are part of a heart-healthy diet. They are good sources of fiber, vitamins, and minerals. Most are low in fat, calories, sodium, and cholesterol. Eat five or more servings of fruits and vegetables per day. Choose whole grain foods (such as bread, cereal, crackers, and pasta) for at least half of your daily grain intake. Grain products provide fiber, vitamins, minerals, and complex carbohydrates. Eating too many grains, especially refined grain foods (such as white bread, pasta, and baked goods) can cause weight gain. Avoid high-fat baked goods such as butter rolls, cheese crackers, and croissants and cream sauces for pasta. Lean proteins, poultry, seafood, dried peas, lentils, nuts, and eggs are good sources of protein, B vitamins, iron, and other vitamins and minerals. Avoid foods with a lot of saturated fats including animal products such as butter, cheese, whole milk, ice cream, sour cream, lard, and fatty meats such as bacon.

Healthy diet Teaching 1941

SN instructed patient that the no concentrated sweets (NCS) diet is designed to limit the total sugar in the diet to achieve and maintain near normal blood sugar levels. Foods that should be avoided includes sugar, regular syrup, molasses, and regular jam and jelly, candy, pie, cake, cookies, doughnuts, etc.

Cardiac Teaching 1965

A cardiac diet, as the name suggests, is often prescribed for patients who have a history of heart related problems / diseases. The cardiac diet is a healthy eating plan prepared to counter diseases such as high blood pressure, obesity, heart attack and so on. Even if a person does not suffer from a heart condition it is advisable to follow this diet as a preventive measure. Some Basic Facts about the Cardiac Diet The following are some basic facts that determine the cardiac diet. Consumption of Foods that Contain Healthy Fats Healthy Fats. Two types of fat that can be beneficial for the body are polyunsaturated fats and monounsaturated fats. Polyunsaturated fats are found in foods such as: leafy green vegetables nuts seeds fish Monounsaturated fats are said to decrease the levels of LDL or ‘bad’ cholesterol in the body. They are found in foods such as: Milk products avocado olives nuts Unhealthy Fats: One should avoid the consumption of trans fat and saturated fats. Trans fat increase the level of bad cholesterol in the body. They are often found in: packaged food items that are fried in some of the foods sold in fast food restaurants Although they help to increase the shelf life of a product they are very harmful for the body. Saturated fats are found in foods such as: cream cheese butter ghee coconut oil

supplemental drinks Teaching 1993

SN instructs us on different ways to make supplemental drinks taste more appetizing, heating the drink in a mug (hot chocolate or warm vanilla milk) -blending it with ice to make a milkshake -blending the ensure with frozen fruit ( esp. bananas or frozen strawberries ) -making a "latte" by foaming/warming the drink and adding coffee -adding coffee to heated ensure -freezing the ensure and eating it like a slushy -add 2 TB peanut butter, 1 TB cocoa powder. Blend, freeze or heat.

Low residue diet Teaching 2003

SN instructed on a low residue diet. A low residue diet is a diet designed to reduce the frequency and volume of stools while prolonging intestinal transit time. It is similar to a low-fiber diet, but typically includes restrictions on foods that increase bowel activity, such as milk, milk products, and prune juice. A low residue diet typically contains less than 7–10 grams of fiber per day. Long term use of this diet, with its emphasis on processed foods and reduced intake of fruits and vegetables, may not provide required amounts of nutrients including potassium, vitamin C, calcium, and folic acid.Patient/caregiver verbalized understanding.

Low fat diet Teaching 2008

RN instructed on low fat diet for treatment of high cholesterol and triglyceride levels. RN explained patient to avoid foods that are rich in fat / cholesterol, choose only lean meat and avoid the fat, eat more fish and poultry, have baked / broiled red meats, fish or poultry instead of fried, use low-fat or fat-free milk, try fat-free or low fat cottage cheese or yogurt in place of cream and sour cream, have steamed vegetables and dress salads with lemon juice, fat free mayonnaise or fat free dressing. RN also instructed patient that Atorvastatin reduces levels of "bad" cholesterol and triglycerides in the blood, while increasing levels of "good" cholesterol and is used to lower cholesterol and triglycerides in the blood and therefore it is used to lower the risk of stroke, heart attack and other heart complications in people with diabetes, coronary heart disease or other risk factors.