Diseases Process

Healthy diet Teaching 2495

SN instructed patient and caregiver about certain foods or eating habits are more likely to result in flushing, diarrhea, gas, bloating, and abdominal pain related to carcinoid syndrome. You only need to avoid particular foods if they cause you to have these symptoms. Keeping a food and symptom diary may be helpful. Record your daily food and drink consumption and any symptoms that you experience. You may start to notice a pattern. Carcinoid patients with symptoms should augment protein in their diets, add more tryptophan in the form of lean meats and protein, and avoid high tyramine-containing foods, which can cause flushing, such as hard and aged cheeses, including cheddar and Stilton; cured meats; and some nuts, specifically walnuts, peanuts, coconuts, and Brazil nuts.

Breathing Teaching 2488

SN instructed patient on how to get plenty of rest and sleep. Take your medicines exactly as prescribed. Call your doctor or nurse call line if you think you are having a problem with your medicine. Find healthy ways to deal with stress. Exercise daily. Get plenty of sleep. Eat regularly and well. Patient verbalized understanding.

Breathing Teaching 2487

SN instructed patient on how can you care for yourself at home. Do not smoke or allow others to smoke around you. If you need help quitting, talk to your doctor about stop-smoking programs and medicines. These can increase your chances of quitting for good. Patient verbalized understanding.

Cardiac Teaching 2461

SN to assess cardiovascular status, identify any signs and symptoms of impaired cardiovascular function. SN to instruct patient on disease process, typical symptoms of an underlying cardiovascular issue include: pain or pressure in the chest, which may indicate angina, pain or discomfort in the arms, left shoulder, elbows, jaw, or back, shortness of breath, nausea and fatigue, lightheadedness or dizziness, cold sweats

Breathing Teaching 2460

Sn to instruct patient on dyspnea process, sometimes, shortness of breath can be a sign of a life-threatening condition. Emergency medical treatment is needed if an individual has any of these symptoms: sudden onset of severe dyspnea, loss of ability to function due to shortness of breath, chest pain, nausea.

Atrial fibrillation Teaching 2459

SN to instruct patient/caregiver regarding self-management of atrial fibrillation, is an irregular and often rapid heart rate that can increase your risk of strokes, heart failure and other heart-related complications, to prevent atrial fibrillation, it's important to live a heart-healthy lifestyle to reduce your risk of heart disease. A healthy lifestyle may include:eating a heart-healthy diet, increasing your physical activity, avoiding smoking, maintaining a healthy weight, limiting or avoiding caffeine and alcohol, reducing stress, as intense stress and anger can cause heart rhythm problems, using over-the-counter medications with caution, as some cold and cough medications contain stimulants that may trigger a rapid heartbeat. Patient verbalized.

Cardiac Teaching 2458

SN instructed patient how identify any signs and symptoms of impaired cardiovascular function, symptoms will vary depending on the specific condition. Some conditions, such as type 2 diabetes or hypertension, may initially cause no symptoms at all symptoms will vary depending on the specific condition. However, typical symptoms of an underlying cardiovascular issue include: pain or pressure in the chest, which may indicate angina, pain or discomfort in the arms, left shoulder, elbows, jaw, or back, shortness of breath, nausea and fatigue, lightheadedness or dizziness, cold sweat or pressure in the chest, which may indicate angina, pain or discomfort in the arms, left shoulder, elbows, jaw, or back, shortness of breath, nausea and fatigue, lightheadedness or dizziness, cold sweats. Call your doctor if your present these symptoms. Patient verbalized. Patient is stable need take medication on time follow medication regimen.

COPD Teaching 2457

SN instructed if your breathing gets bad, oxygen can help make it easier. With COPD, your lungs don't absorb oxygen the way they should, so they can't get it to the rest of your body. That makes it harder for your body and your organs to do their jobs. When you use extra oxygen, breathing is easier and you're able to do more every day.

COPD Teaching 2456

Instructed patient about breathing tips for people with COPD take your medicine follow the treatment plan your doctor gives you. Take your medicine exactly as prescribed and listen to any other advice she has on how to take care of your COPD. If you have any questions, be sure to ask, get good sleep sleep problems are common with COPD. It's partly due to breathing symptoms, but the medications you take can also play a role. Make sure you get enough good sleep so you stay healthy. Talk to your doctor about treatments you can get. Some drugs that can help you sleep might make your breathing worse.

COPD Teaching 2455

Instructed patient about breathing tips for people with COPD be aware of your weight because it takes so much energy to breathe, you might be underweight. Your doctor can suggest supplements if a healthy diet doesn't help you get to a good weight. If you're overweight, losing extra pounds can make your breathing easier, avoid chemicals skip scented products like soaps and perfumes. When you clean, use natural products without a scent. They might not bother your breathing as much, see your doctor regularly go to all of your checkups, even if you feel fine. It's important for your doctor to see how well your lungs are working. Bring a list of all your medicines to each visit. Make a note of any changes, and call if your symptoms get worse or if you have any new ones.