Tracheostomy

Tracheostomy Teaching 1862
Instructed patient what to do if a person has trouble breathing The most common reason for breathing problems, other than an illness, is If you have trouble passing the catheter into the trach and it feels tight, put a few drops of saline into the tube and try to suction again. Do not force the catheter; it may push the plug in further. If you are unable to remove the mucus plug, change the trach tube and try to suction again.
Tracheostomy Teaching 1861
Instructed patient what to do if a person has trouble breathing The most common reason for breathing problems, other than an illness, is that the trach tube becomes plugged with dried mucus. Making sure to provide enough humidity can help prevent this problem. However, if the trach does become plugged, try to remove the plug by suctioning.
Tracheostomy Teaching 1860
Instructed patient the following is a list of preventive measures that may help to avoid some problems: Make sure that the trach is open to air and that nothing is blocking it such as clothing or bedding. Always have a child nap or sleep with their apnea monitor or pulse oximeter on. Do not discontinue their use unless discussed with your ENT doctor.
Tracheostomy Teaching 1859
Instructed patient the following is a list of preventive measures that may help to avoid some problems: Make sure the trach is getting enough humidity. Humidity will keep the mucus loose and decrease the chances of a mucus plug. If you hear a whistling sound from the trach, this might mean that the airway is dry. Always make sure the trach ties are securely fastened and are tight enough around the neck.
Tracheostomy Teaching 1858
Instructed patient in emergency care These pages will cover prevention of an emergency situation, and what to do if: Your loved one has trouble breathing or stops breathing You cannot insert a trach tube The trach falls out.
Tracheostomy Teaching 1857
Instructed patient supplies that can be cleaned and disinfected for re-use: Trach tubes Trach swivel adapters Trach ties, Aerosol masks ,T-Pieces, Speaking valves, Nebulizers, Most hard plastic supplies. Cleaning your respiratory equipment: (Weekly),Cleaning and Disinfecting the Humidifier: (Daily)
Tracheostomy Teaching 1856
Instructed patient be careful not to touch the trach cannula while changing the tube. You do not want to contaminate the cannula. Other times to suction include before eating, or before and after sleeping. Be aware that every sound you hear does not mean they need to be suctioned.
Tracheostomy Teaching 1855
Instructed patient on signs and symptoms that indicate a need for suctioning include: Nasal flaring (which is seen when the nostril flares out when a person breaths in) Change in skin color from normal to pale or blue Changes in activity, such as if a child is upset or inconsolable, or appears to be sleepy Increased coughing.
Tracheostomy Teaching 1854
Instructed patient on signs and symptoms that indicate a need for suctioning include: Seeing mucus in the opening of the trach tube or hearing mucus in the airway Increased respiratory rate or effort Retractions (which is seen when the skin between the ribs pulls in while breathing.
Tracheostomy Teaching 1853
Instructed patient as much as possible, the skin should be kept clean and dry. You may need to clean the skin around the trach tube several times throughout the day. Call your doctor if you notice thick secretions that are yellow or green in color.