Colostomy

Colostomy Teaching 1887
Instructed patient / caregiver having a stoma is a major event and patients can become very anxious and depressed. Adequate counseling is vital and this may need to include mental health specialists.
Colostomy Teaching 1886
Instructed patient a really important part of planning patients for stomas is to ensure the site is appropriate. Poor siting leads to a stoma which the patient has difficulty in changing and cleaning. This leads to increased risk of skin, and other, complications.
Colostomy Teaching 1885
SN instructed patient instructed patient caregiver how to do Ostomy Care, as follow: Preparing, Applying, and Removing an Ostomy System to make the process easier and more effective, here are several easy steps you and your patients can follow when applying and removing an ostomy system: Remove Use an Adhesive Remover Wipe, Clean Clean & Dry Clean peristomal skin with non-moisturizing or non-oily soap, rinse well with clean water and pat dry, Measure Measure Stoma Place the stoma measuring guide over the stoma, measuring the stoma at the base., Protect use an Adhesive Remover Wipe, Apply New Pouching System/Skin Barrier. Make sure to have a good seal around the stoma.
Colostomy Teaching 1874
Instructed patient If there is a small leak under my skin barrier, is it okay to patch it with tape or paste: Do not try to patch the pouching system with tape or paste. A leak under the skin barrier should not be fixed. Leaving a leaking pouch on can cause skin irritation. Always empty your pouch before it is half-full. Release gas before the pouch gets too full. If you have a lot of gas, you may want to consider using a pouch with a vent or filter.
Colostomy Teaching 1873
Instructed patient the stoma is your bowel. It is protected by mucus so stool or urine won’t hurt it. A stoma rarely becomes infected. The most important thing is to protect the skin around your stoma. A correct fitting pouching system is the best way to prevent an infection of your skin. If there is a small leak under my skin barrier, is it okay to patch it with tape or paste: Always change your pouching system at the first signs of leakage.
Colostomy Teaching 1872
Instructed patient when you have a stoma that drains urine or loose stool you may want to consider using an extended wear skin barrier because it will give your skin added protection. Itching or burning under the skin barrier may indicate that you have leakage, a skin rash, or a skin infection. You need to remove your pouching system as soon as possible to check your skin for any irritation.
Colostomy Teaching 1871
Instructed patient• Check your skin and the back of your skin barrier each time you change your pouching system. You can use a mirror to check your skin under the stoma. Look for any places where stool or urine may have leaked under the skin barrier and onto your skin. When you apply your next pouching system these areas may need some extra reinforcement with skin barrier strips, rings or paste.
Colostomy Teaching 1870
Instructed patient measure your stoma once a week for the first 6 to 8 weeks after your ostomy surgery. Your stoma shrinks while it is healing and you need to keep measuring so you can make sure that the opening in the skin barrier is the right size for your stoma. Remeasure your stoma if any irritation develops between the stoma and skin barrier wafer.
Colostomy Teaching 1869
Instructed patient If you do put tape around the skin barrier edges do not remove the tape after water activities. Removing the
 tape may cause the skin barrier to loosen. It is helpful to hold your skin smooth as you put your pouching system on to avoid wrinkles that may lead to leakage.
Colostomy Teaching 1868
Instructed patient in some cases of colostomy, skin irritation or infection can result from stool that leaks under the bag. A hernia can develop around a colostomy, and the bowel may become narrow. Taking good care of your stoma and eating a balanced diet can help you avoid these problems. Pouching systems are waterproof. However, you may feel more secure if you wear an ostomy belt or put 
tape around the edges of your skin barrier when you are in the water.