Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia Teaching 1738
Patient and caregiver instructed that low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can happen to everyone who has diabetes. Symptoms include headache, hunger, sweating, pale skin, irritability, dizziness, feeling shaky, or trouble concentrating. Always keep a source of sugar with you in case you have low blood sugar. Sugar sources include fruit juice, hard candy, crackers, raisins, and non-diet soda. Be sure your family and close friends know how to help you in an emergency.
Hypoglycemia Teaching 1574
Caregiver ALF staff was instructed in the most common side effects of Tradjenta such as stuffy or runny nose and sore throat. Hypoglycemia may occur when linagliptin is combined with insulin or a sulfonylurea-type drug. Allergic reactions and muscle pain also may occur.
Hypoglycemia Teaching 806
Patient was instructed on hypoglycemia. When blood sugar drops too low, the level of insulin declines and other cells in the pancreas release glucagon, which causes the liver to turn stored glycogen back into glucose and release it into the blood. This brings blood sugar levels back up to normal.
Hypoglycemia Teaching 766
Patient was instructed on hypoglycemia. Normally, blood glucose levels increase slightly after you eat a meal. When blood sugar rises, cells in the pancreas release insulin, causing the body to absorb glucose from the blood and lowering the blood sugar level to normal.
Hypoglycemia Teaching 764
Patient was instructed on hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia may result from a variety of causes, which include: Spontaneous reactive hypoglycemia. Symptoms of hypoglycemia within 1 to 2 hours after a meal in people who have not had stomach surgery is called spontaneous reactive hypoglycemia. It also is sometimes called functional or idiopathic hypoglycemia. In many cases, it is difficult to verify that the symptoms are caused by low blood sugar.
Hypoglycemia Teaching 775
Patient was instructed on hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia may result from a variety of causes that include: Other causes. Hypoglycemia also may occur, though rarely with prolonged fasting or missed meals, severe malnutrition, or prolonged strenuous exercise.
Hypoglycemia Teaching 765
Patient was instructed on hypoglycemia. Insulin, glucagon and other hormone levels rise and fall to keep blood sugar in a normal range. Too little or too much of these hormones can cause blood sugar levels to fall too low (hypoglycemia) or rise too high (hyperglycemia).
Hypoglycemia Teaching 774
Patient was instructed on hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia may result from a variety of causes, which include: Alimentary hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia within 1 to 2 hours after a meal sometimes occurs when stomach contents empty into the intestines too rapidly. This causes the rapid absorption of glucose into the blood and an overproduction of insulin (hyperinsulinism) in response. This problem may develop after surgery for peptic ulcers, obesity, or other stomach problems.
Hypoglycemia Teaching 773
Patient was instructed on hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia may result from a variety of causes that include: Alcohol. In some individuals, drinking alcohol can cause a drop in blood sugar levels. Hypoglycemia has been associated with chronic alcoholism and binge drinking. Hypoglycemia associated with binge drinking can be particularly severe if a person has not eaten within about 6 hours because fasting can impair the liver's ability to make new glucose.
Hypoglycemia Teaching 790
Patient was instructed on hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia may result from a variety of causes that include: Too much insulin. Tumors in the pancreas (insulinomas), certain disorders of the pancreas, or some autoimmune diseases can cause too much insulin to be produced. These conditions are rare.