Medications

Constipation Teaching 2293

Colace is a laxative prescribed to treat occasional constipation, as well as constipation associated with certain medical conditions. Docusate sodium, the active ingredient in Colace, works by allowing water and fats to get into the stool. This helps soften the stool and makes the passing stool more comfortable. Your doctor may recommend stool softeners such as docusate sodium as the first method used for preventing and treating constipation.

Bleeding Precautions Teaching 2290

Patient instructed on risk for internal bleeding R/T taking Warfarin. Any s/s of an internal bleed include: abdominal pain, black, tarry or bright red stool, coffee ground emesis, coughing up blood, unusual dark purple large bruising, & bloody urine. Patient should to seek immediate medical attention if any of these occur.

Antibiotic Teaching 2277

SN instructed patient/CG to seek medical attention if you have signs of an allergic reaction to Augmentin such as: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have: severe stomach pain, diarrhea that is watery or bloody; pale or yellowed skin, dark colored urine, fever, confusion or weakness; loss of appetite, upper stomach pain, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); easy bruising or bleeding; little or no urination; or severe skin reaction - fever, sore throat, swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads (especially in the face or upper body) and causes blistering and peeling.

General information Teaching 2276

SN instructed patient and care giver to take Carafate (sucralfate) on an empty stomach, at least 1 hour before or 2 hours after a meal and avoid taking any other medications within 2 hours before or after you take Carafate. Side effects of Carafate include: nausea, vomiting, GI upset/pain, constipation, diarrhea, insomnia, dizziness, drowsiness or headache.

Antibiotic Teaching 2273

SN instructed patient/CG about proper nutrition while taking antibiotics. Taking probiotics during antibiotic treatment can reduce the risk of diarrhea, although the two should be taken a few hours apart. Probiotics can also help restore the gut bacteria after antibiotics. Fermented foods contain healthy bacteria, including Lactobacilli, which can help restore damage to the microbiota caused by antibiotics. Yogurt may also reduce the risk of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. High-fiber foods like whole grains, beans, fruits and vegetables can help the growth of healthy bacteria in the gut. They should be eaten after taking antibiotics but not during, as fiber may reduce antibiotic absorption. Probiotics are foods that help the growth of healthy bacteria in the gut and may help restore the gut microbiota after taking antibiotics. SN instructed also to avoid the ingestion of grapefruit and calcium-fortified foods while on antibiotics since they can affect how antibiotics are absorbed in the body.

Insulin Teaching 2269

Patient instructed Humalog (insulin lispro) is a fast-acting insulin that starts to work about 15 minutes after injection, peaks in about 1 hour, and keeps working for 2 to 4 hours. It is used to improve blood sugar control in patients with DMII. Most people who take Humalog use a sliding scale or take a certain dose routinely throughout the day. If you are taking this medication with meals, use it within 15 minutes before or just after you eat. Do not take Humalog if your blood sugar is below 60 or you are experiencing s/s of hypoglycemia.

Bupropion Teaching 2255

SN educated patient on Bupropion. This medication is used to treat major depression. This medication works by helping to restore the balance of natural chemicals in the brain. Take this medication by mouth, usually once daily with or without food. If nausea occurs, you may take this drug with food. Do not crush, chew or break the tablets. Swallow tablets whole. Since this drug may cause sleeplessness at first, it is best not to take near bedtime. The dosage is based on your medical condition and response to therapy. Do not take more or less medication than prescribed. Taking more than the recommended dose of bupropion will increase your risk of having a seizure. side effects may include dry mouth, nausea, vomiting, stomach/abdominal pain, flushing, headache/migraine, loss of appetite, trouble sleeping, increased sweating, strange taste in mouth, weakness, drowsiness, or blurred vision may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, notify your doctor promptly. Patient voiced understanding.

Lisinopril Teaching 2219

SN instructed patient about the drug lisinopril is a drug of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor class used primarily in treatment of hypertension ACE is important because it is an enzyme responsible for producing the chemical, angiotensin II. Angiotensin II causes muscles in most arteries, including the arteries of the heart, to contract, thereby narrowing the arteries and elevating blood pressure. ACE inhibitors such as lisinopril lower blood pressure by reducing the production of angiotensin II, thereby relaxing arterial muscle and enlarging arteries. When the blood pressure is lower, the heart - including the failing heart - does not have to work as hard to pump blood. The arteries supplying the heart with blood also enlarge during treatment with ACE inhibitors. This increases the flow of blood and oxygen to the heart, further improving the ability of the heart to pump bloodSide effects include: dizziness due to a drop in blood pressure, trouble breathing, blistering, peeling, red skin rash, confusion, weakness, uneven heartbeat, trouble breathing, numbness or tingling in your hands, feet, or lips, dark urine or pale stools. Pt verbalized understanding.

Pravastatin Teaching 2218

Patient and CG instructed on Pravastatin. Pravastatin is used to lower cholesterol and triglycerides (types of fat) in the blood. Pravastatin is also used to lower the risk of stroke, heart attack, and other heart complications in people with or without coronary heart disease or other risk factors. Pravastatin can cause a condition that results in the breakdown of skeletal muscle tissue, leading to kidney failure. This condition may be more likely to occur in older adults and in people who have kidney disease or poorly controlled hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid). Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to pravastatin: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. In rare cases, pravastatin can cause a condition that results in the breakdown of skeletal muscle tissue, leading to kidney failure. Stop using and call your doctor at once if you have:unexplained muscle pain, tenderness, or weakness; fever, unusual tiredness; dark colored urine; chest pain; upper stomach pain, loss of appetite; or jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes). Common pravastatin side effects may include: muscle or joint pain; nausea, vomiting, diarrhea; headache; or cold symptoms such as stuffy nose, sneezing, sore throat.

Lovastatin Teaching 2215

Lovastatin reduces levels of "bad" cholesterol (low-density lipoprotein, or LDL) and triglycerides in the blood, while increasing levels of "good" cholesterol (high-density lipoprotein, or HDL). Lovastatin is used to lower the risk of stroke, heart attack, and other heart complications in people with diabetes, coronary heart disease, or other risk factors. Lovastatin can cause a condition that results in the breakdown of skeletal muscle tissue, leading to kidney failure. This condition may be more likely to occur in older adults and in people who have kidney disease or poorly controlled hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid). Avoid grapefruit and grapefruit juice, it may interact with lovastatin and lead to unwanted side effects. Avoid the use of grapefruit products while taking lovastatin. Avoid eating foods that are high in fat or cholesterol. Lovastatin will not be as effective in lowering your cholesterol if you do not follow a cholesterol-lowering diet plan. Avoid drinking alcohol. It can raise triglyceride levels and may increase your risk of liver damage. Common side effects may include: constipation, stomach pain; muscle cramps; or headache. You can lower your Cholesterol by avoiding alcohol and avoid eating foods that are high in fat or cholesterol. Eat foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids, You can add soluble fiber to your diet by eating oats and fruits, beans, lentils, and vegetables. Exercise on most days of the week and increase your physical activity.