VAC

VAC Teaching 1838
Instructed caregiver when should I call healthcare provider? Contact your healthcare provider or physician immediately:.If you have difficulty breathing and it is not relieved by your usual method of clearing secretions. When secretions become thick, if crusting occurs or mucus plugs are present, Your physician may recommend increasing your fluids or using cool mist humidification,If you have any other problems or concerns.
VAC Teaching 1836
Instructed patient when should I call my clinician when on V.A.C. Therapy: immediately report to your clinician if you have any of these symptoms: fever over 102°, diarrhea, headache, sore throat, confusion, sick to your stomach or throwing up, dizziness or feel faint when you stand up, redness around the wound, skin itches or rash present, wound is sore, red or swollen, pus or bad smell from the wound, area in or around wound feels very warm.
VAC Teaching 1835
Instructed patient abour the V.A.C. therapy System is an Advanced Wound Therapy System consisting of a V.A.C. Therapy unit that delivers negative pressure and a sterile plastic tubing with SensaT.R.A.C, pressure sensing lumens that connect the therapy unit to the dressing Special foam dressings. KCI recommends the V.A.C. Dressings be changed every 48 to 72 hours, but no less than 3 times per week. Patient has the ability to move around depending on the condition, the wound location and type of therapy unit prescribed. The V.A.C. Therapy System may be disconnected so you can take a shower. Therapy may not be off any longer than two hours per day.
VAC Teaching 1834
Instructed patient unlike gauze bandages that merely cover a wound, V.A.C. therapy actively works to help the wound healing process. The V.A.C.therapy system helps: promote wound healing, provide a moist wound healing environment, draw wound edges together, remove fluid and infectious materials, reduce wound odor, reduce the need for daily dressing changes.
VAC Teaching 1833
Instructed patient about vacuum assisted closure ( VAC ) therapy the length of time to heal a wound is different for every patient. General conditions, size and location of the wound, and nutritional status can affect the time it takes for a wound to heal. Your clinician will discuss when and why V.A.C. therapy may begin and end.
VAC Teaching 1827
Instructed patient about vacuum assisted closure ( VAC ) therapy help provide the necessary mechanisms to promote granulation tissue formation.
VAC Teaching 1826
Instructed patient about vacuum assisted closure ( VAC ) therapy provides intermittent and continuous therapy with integrated patient safety features.
VAC Teaching 1825
Instructed patient about vacuum assisted closure ( VAC ) therapy Therapy, promotes wound healing and how its unique mechanisms of action differentiate it from other NPWT devices.
VAC Teaching 1824
Instructed patient training for patients and their caregivers who 
will be using the device at home should include how to: Recognize signs and symptoms of complications, such as redness, 
warmth, and pain associated with possible infection Contact appropriate healthcare providers, especially in emergency 
situations, respond to emergency situations; for instance, if bright red blood is seen in the tubing or canister, to immediately stop NPWT, apply direct manual pressure to the dressing, and activate emergency medical services.
VAC Teaching 1823
Instructed patient about VAC training for patients and their caregivers who will be using the device at home should include
 how to: Safely operate the device; provide a copy of printed instructions for patient use from the specific device manufacturer
Respond to audio and visual alarms, perform dressing changes.